BLOOD AND HEDONISM

Instinct is telling me it’s time to go to sleep.

See you all tomorrow, ladies and gentlemen. <3

anything-japanese:

The Garden of Words (言の葉の庭)

aerienette:

。Blessed Be。

Very nice touch I see in news articles with “The Scots and the British” as a constant phrase seen in them lately. 

Trying to stay awake for… mmm, three more hours, then probably sleep for 10-12 hours again. 

Expect hipster crap until then and possibly after anyway, even if I get a second wind it will be vague at best. 

massarrah:

An Assyrian Scholar Petitions King Ashurbanipal
"May the king my lord listen to the plea of his servant. May the king investigate my entire case.”
In this letter, written in the Neo-Assyrian dialect of Akkadian, the scholar Urad-Gula complains to king Ashurbanipal about the rise and fall of his fortunes while in the employ of the palace. The scholar uses literary topoi from canonical works of literature and references numerous scholarly works, such as the omen series Enūma Anu Enlil. He complains about his current impoverished state and that of his fellow scholars, while harkening back to the “good old days” of his scholarly service to the court of Esarhaddon, the previous king (and father of Ashurbanipal) from whom he received gifts, leftovers, and the occasional mule and ox, as well as two minas of silver every year.
Not only does the letter contain references and allusions to known works of literature and science, but it also provides information about the financial position of such scholars and their dependence on the king’s patronage.
Sources: 1; 2; Ulla Koch, Mesopotamian Astrology (1995); Simo Parpola, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars II (1983)
Nineveh, ca. 644 BCE.
British Museum. Photo from CDLI.

massarrah:

An Assyrian Scholar Petitions King Ashurbanipal

"May the king my lord listen to the plea of his servant. May the king investigate my entire case.”

In this letter, written in the Neo-Assyrian dialect of Akkadian, the scholar Urad-Gula complains to king Ashurbanipal about the rise and fall of his fortunes while in the employ of the palace. The scholar uses literary topoi from canonical works of literature and references numerous scholarly works, such as the omen series Enūma Anu Enlil. He complains about his current impoverished state and that of his fellow scholars, while harkening back to the “good old days” of his scholarly service to the court of Esarhaddon, the previous king (and father of Ashurbanipal) from whom he received gifts, leftovers, and the occasional mule and ox, as well as two minas of silver every year.

Not only does the letter contain references and allusions to known works of literature and science, but it also provides information about the financial position of such scholars and their dependence on the king’s patronage.

Sources: 12; Ulla Koch, Mesopotamian Astrology (1995); Simo Parpola, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars II (1983)

Nineveh, ca. 644 BCE.

British Museum. Photo from CDLI.